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Weiss Group Meetings Self-Assembly & Molecular Devices Multi-Group Meetings


Thursday 29 June 2017
IEEE N3 Summer School, Montreal, Canada, Wednesday 28 - Friday 30 June 2017

Cooperative Function in Atomically Precise Nanoscale Assemblies
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA

We use molecular design, tailored syntheses, intermolecular interactions, and selective chemistry to explore the ultimate limits of miniaturization. We direct molecules into desired positions to create nanostructures, to connect functional molecules to the outside world, and to serve as test structures for measuring single or bundled molecules. Interactions within and between molecules can be designed, directed, measured, understood, and exploited at unprecedented scales. Such interactions can be used to form precise molecular assemblies, nanostructures, and patterns, and to control and to stabilize function. We selectively test hypothesized mechanisms of function by varying molecular design, chemical environment, and measurement conditions to enable or to disable function and control using predictive and testable means. Critical to understanding these variations has been developing the means to make tens to hundreds of thousands of independent single-molecule/assembly measurements in order to develop sufficiently significant statistical distributions, while retaining the heterogeneity intrinsic in the measurements. We use a number of excitation mechanisms to induce changes in the molecules and assemblies, including electric field, light, electrochemical potential, ion binding, and chemistry. We measure the electronic coupling of the contacts between the molecules and substrates by measuring the polarizabilities of the connected functional molecules. We have likewise developed and applied the means to map buried chemical functionality and interactions. The next steps are to learn to assemble and to operate molecules together, both cooperatively and hierarchically, in analogy to biological muscles. We discuss our initial efforts in this area, in which we find both interferences and cooperativity.


Sunday 2 - Wednesday 5 July 2017
10th ICNP - International Conference on Nanophotonics, Recife, Brazil, Sunday 2 - Wednesday 6 July 2017

Global Opportunities in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

Two seemingly conflicting trends in nanoscience and nanotechnology are our increasing ability to reach the limits of atomically precise structures and our growing understanding of the importance of heterogeneity in the structure and function of molecules and nanoscale assemblies. By having developed the "eyes" to see, to record spectra, and to measure function at the nanoscale, we have been able to fabricate structures with precision as well as to understand the important and intrinsic heterogeneity of function found in these assemblies.

I will discuss the challenges, opportunities, and consequences of pursuing strategies to address both precision on the one hand and heterogeneity on the other [1]. In our laboratories, we are taking the first steps to exploit precise assembly to optimize properties such as perfect electronic contacts in materials [2]. We are also developing the means to make tens to hundreds of thousands of independent multimodal nanoscale measurements in order to understand the variations in structure and function that have previously been inaccessible in both synthetic and biological systems [3,4].

Another outcome of the development of our field has been our ability to communicate across fields [5,6]. This skill that we develop in our students and colleagues has enhanced and accelerated the impact of nanoscience and nanotechnology on other fields, such as neuroscience and the microbiome [7,8]. I will discuss the opportunities presented by these entanglements and give recent examples of advances enabled by nanoscience and nanotechnology [9,10].

References
[1] C. R. Kagan, L. E. Fernandez, Y. Gogotsi, P. T. Hammond, M. C. Hersam, A. E. Nel, R. M. Penner, C. G. Willson, and P. S. Weiss, ACS Nano 10, 9093-9103 (2016).
[2] P. Han, K. Akagi, F. F. Canova, R. Shimizu, H. Oguchi, S. Shiraki, P. S. Weiss, N. Asao, and T. Hitosugi, ACS Nano 9, 12035-12044 (2015).
[3] B. K. Pathem, S. A. Claridge, Y. B. Zheng, and P. S. Weiss, Annual Review of Physical Chemistry 64, 605-630 (2013).
[4] D. Yugay, D. P. Goronzy, L. M. Kawakami, S. A. Claridge, T.-B. Song, Z. Yan, Y.-H. Xie, J. Gilles, Y. Yang, and P. S. Weiss, Nano Letters 16, 6282-6289 (2016).
[5] W. W. C. Chan, M, Chhowalla, S. Glotzer, Y. Gogotsi, J. H. Hafner, P. T. Hammond, M. C. Hersam, A. Javey, C. R. Kagan, A. Khademhosseini, N. A. Kotov, S.-T. Lee, Y. Li, H. Möhwald, P. A. Mulvaney, A. E. Nel, P. J. Nordlander, W. J. Parak, R. M. Penner, A. L. Rogach, R. E. Schaak, M. M. Stevens, A. T. S. Wee, C. G. Willson, L. E. Fernandez, P. S. Weiss, ACS Nano 10, 10615-10617 (2016).
[6] J. A. Jackman, D.-J. Cho, J. Lee, J. M. Chen, F. Besenbacher, D. A. Bonnell, M. C. Hersam, P. S. Weiss, and N.-J. Cho, ACS Nano 10, 5595-5599 (2016).
[7] A. P. Alivisatos, A. M. Andrews, E. S. Boyden, M. Chun, G. M. Church, K. Deisseroth, J. P. Donoghue, S. E. Fraser, J. Lippincott-Schwartz, L. L. Looger, S. Masmanidis, P. L. McEuen, A. V. Nurmikko, H. Park, D. S. Peterka, C. Reid, M. L. Roukes, A. Scherer, M. Schnitzer, T. J. Sejnowski, K. L. Shepard, D. Tsao, G. Turrigiano, P. S. Weiss, C. Xu, R. Yuste, and X. Zhuang, ACS Nano 7, 1850-1866 (2013).
[8] J. S. Biteen, P. C. Blainey, Z. G. Cardon, M. Chun, G. M. Church, P. C. Dorrestein, S. E. Fraser, J. A. Gilbert, J. K. Jansson, R. Knight, J. F. Miller, A. Ozcan, K. A. Prather, S. R. Quake, E. G. Ruby, P. A. Silver, S. Taha, G. van den Engh, P. S. Weiss, G. C. L. Wong, A. T. Wright, and T. D. Young, ACS Nano 10, 6-37 (2016).
[9] J. Kim, Y. S. Rim, H. Chen, H. H. Cao, N. Nakatsuka, H. L. Hinton, C. Zhao, A. M. Andrews, Y. Yang, and P. S. Weiss, ACS Nano 9, 4572-4582 (2015).
[10] M. Ding, H.-Y. Shiu, S.-L. Li, C. K. Lee, G. Wang, H. Wu, N. O. Weiss, T. D. Young, P. S. Weiss, G. C. L. Wong, K. H. Nealson, Y. Huang, and X. Duan, ACS Nano 10, 9919-9926 (2016).


Wednesday 12 July 2017, 7? PM
Cafe Art|Science, Cambridge, MA

A Discussion on the NAKFI Process
Brandon Ballengee,
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095
Moderated by JD Talasek, Cultural Programs of the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC


Wednesday 26 July 2017, 1145 AM
Chemeca and Centenary of the Royal Australian Chemical Institute, Melbourne, Australia, Monday 24 - Wednesday 26 July 2017

Precise Chemical, Physical, and Electronic Nanoscale Contacts
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

The physical, electronic, mechanical, and chemical connections that materials make to one another and to the outside world are critical. Just as the properties and applications of conventional semiconductor devices depend on these contacts, so do nanomaterials, many nanoscale measurements, and devices of the future. We discuss the important roles that these contacts can play in preserving key transport and other properties. Initial nanoscale connections and measurements guide the path to future opportunities and challenges ahead. Band alignment and minimally disruptive connections are both targets and can be characterized in both experiment and theory. I discuss our initial forays into this area in a number of materials systems.


Wednesday 26 July 2017, Afternoon
Academic Sharp Brain Competition at Chemeca and Centenary of the Royal Australian Chemical Institute, Melbourne, Australia, Monday 24 - Friday 28 July 2017

Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


Thursday 27 July 2017
RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia

TBA
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


Monday 14 August 2017 2 PM
Advances in Functional Materials, Los Angeles, CA, Monday 14 - Thursday 17 August 2017

Precise Chemical, Physical, and Electronic Nanoscale Contacts
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

The physical, electronic, mechanical, and chemical connections that materials make to one another and to the outside world are critical. Just as the properties and applications of conventional semiconductor devices depend on these contacts, so do nanomaterials, many nanoscale measurements, and devices of the future. We discuss the important roles that these contacts can play in preserving key transport and other properties. Initial nanoscale connections and measurements guide the path to future opportunities and challenges ahead. Band alignment and minimally disruptive connections are both targets and can be characterized in both experiment and theory. I discuss our initial forays into this area in a number of materials systems.


Sunday 20 August 2017, 1 PMRoom 151B, Washington Convention Center
National American Chemical Society Meeting, Washington, DC, Sunday 20 - Thursday 24 August 2017
Phyiscal Chemistry Awards Symposium in Honor of Prof. Lasse Jensen

Nanoscale Optical Interactions in Precise Assemblies
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

We use molecular design, tailored syntheses, intermolecular interactions, and selective chemistry to direct molecules into desired positions to create nanostructures with controlled environments and dimensionality, to connect functional molecules to the outside world, and to serve as test structures for measuring single or bundled molecules and assemblies. We have developed and applied new multimodal nanoscale analysis tools based on the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to measure structure, function, and spectra simultaneously. We are particularly interested in the interactions of photons with precisely assembled structures. The measured results of photoexcitation include photoconductivity and regioselective reaction. We apply this method to optimize molecules and materials for energy conversion and storage. Related imaging spectroscopies we have developed give access to the cooperative action of assembled molecular motors and the identification and orientations of parts of molecules such as amyloid-forming oligopeptides without averaging and without the need to crystallize the biomolecular assemblies. Concepts from sparsity and compressive sensing are developed and applied to guide efficient data acquisition and to accelerate data analysis and information assembly.


Sunday 20 August 2017, 455 PM, Grand Ballroom North, Renaissance Washington
National American Chemical Society Meeting, Washington, DC, Sunday 20 - Thursday 24 August 2017
Inorganic Nanoscience Award Symposium in Honor of Prof. Shana Kelley

Nanobiosensor arrays for multiplexed measurements of the spatiotemporal dynamics of neurotransmitters and microbiome signalomics
Paul S. Weiss1,2,3 and Anne M. Andrews1,2,4
1California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of 2Chemistry & Biochemistry, 3Materials Science & Engineering, and 4Psychiatry, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

Investigating multiplexed biochemical signaling requires sensitive and specific detection at the time and length scales of function. We couple the molecular recognition properties of rationally designed, chemically synthesized nucleic acid sequences, aptamers, with direct signal detection via field-effect transistors (FETs). Aptamers can be designed for a range of target detection, signal transduction, response speed, and in vivo stability. Changes in biomolecular signaling molecule concentrations are monitored via optimized binding-induced aptamer conformation changes that are transduced into amplified electrical signals. For the small-molecule neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine, aptamer FETs have limits of dection of 10 fM and retain their functionality in full ionic strength biological fluids including artificial cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue. In other applications, we are able to "listen in" on the interspecies communications of signaling in competing populations in the microbiome.


Monday 21 August 2017, 8 AM, Constitution E, Grand Hyatt Washington
National American Chemical Society Meeting, Washington, DC, Sunday 20 - Thursday 24 August 2017
Symposium on Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine

Nanoscience Approaches to Heterogeneity in Biological Systems
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

The great promise of single-molecule/assembly measurements is to understand how critical variations in structure, conformation, and environment relate to and control function. New approaches to sensing, imaging, and analysis are keys to elucidating these associations. I will discuss current and upcoming advances and will pose the challenges that lie ahead in creating, developing, and applying new tools for biology and medicine. These advances include using biomolecular recognition in sensor arrays to probe dynamic chemistry in the brain and microbiome systems. It also includes fusing spectroscopic imaging modalities and freeing up bandwidth in measurements to record simultaneous data streams and to expand our dynamic range. Recent advances in sparsity and compressive sensing can be applied both to new analysis methods and to directing measurements so as to assemble and to converge structural and functional information. Early examples will be discussed.


Monday 21 August 2017, 340 PM, Independence F - Grand Hyatt Washington
National American Chemical Society Meeting, Washington, DC, Sunday 20 - Thursday 24 August 2017
Symposium on Self-Assembly & Non-Covalent Interactions: The Fundamental Science of Supramolecular Materials

Cage Molecule Self-Assembly
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

Upright, symmetric cage molecules self-assembled on surfaces have simple domain and defect structures. Unlike linear molecules, such as alkanethiols on Au{111}, these cage molecules do not tilt and do not conformationally relax. The lattices of the cage molecules are determined by the projections of the cages on the surface. Thus, different isomers, such as carboranethiols on Au{111}, form identical lattice structures. These monolayers enable key tests of simple phenomena, such as the effects of dipole moment direction and amplitude. For example, molecules with dipoles parallel to the surface form nonpolar monolayers and outcompete molecules with dipoles normal the surface, which form polar monolayers. These properties can be measured both at the macroscopic and nanoscopic scales. We understand the enhanced stability of the nonpolar surfaces to aligned dipoles in the monolayers and set out to measure such effects. Using combinations of spectroscopic imaging and novel image analyses based on advances in compressive sensing and sparsity, we find that dipoles do align, even across strcutural domain boundaries and step edges. We use mixed self-assembled monolayers of carboranes to tune and to optimize the band alignment of organic electronic devices without changing the morphology of the active layer. We assemble multifunctionalized cage molecules and show that we can protonate and deprotonate thiol(ate)s to change the valency of attachment to the surface through simple reactions. These experiments are closely coupled to theory and simulations to give us detailed understanding of the supramolecular systems.


Tuesday 29 - Thursday 31 August 2017
ChinaNano 2017, Beijing, China, Tuesday 29 - Thursday 31 August 2017
Keynote Address in Symposium on Bioinspired Interfacial Materials and Devices

Nanobiosensor arrays for multiplexed measurements of the spatiotemporal dynamics of neurotransmitters and microbiome signalomics
Paul S. Weiss1,2,3 and Anne M. Andrews1,2,4
1California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of 2Chemistry & Biochemistry, 3Materials Science & Engineering, and 4Psychiatry, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

Investigating multiplexed biochemical signaling requires sensitive and specific detection at the time and length scales of function. We couple the molecular recognition properties of rationally designed, chemically synthesized nucleic acid sequences, aptamers, with direct signal detection via field-effect transistors (FETs). Aptamers can be designed for a range of target detection, signal transduction, response speed, and in vivo stability. Changes in biomolecular signaling molecule concentrations are monitored via optimized binding-induced aptamer conformation changes that are transduced into amplified electrical signals. For the small-molecule neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine, aptamer FETs have limits of dection of 10 fM and retain their functionality in full ionic strength biological fluids including artificial cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue. In other applications, we are able to "listen in" on the interspecies communications of signaling in competing populations in the microbiome.


Monday 4 - Thursday 7 September 2017
Max Planck – EPFL Center for Molecular Nanoscience and Technology Summer School: Molecules at Surfaces and Interfaces - From Structure to Interactions

Tutorial on Patterning across Scales
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA


Monday 4 - Thursday 7 September 2017
Max Planck – EPFL Center for Molecular Nanoscience and Technology Summer School: Molecules at Surfaces and Interfaces - From Structure to Interactions

Designing, Measuring, and Exploiting Interactions to Pattern Hierarchically from the Submolecular to the Centimeter Scale
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA


Monday 4 - Friday 8 September 2017
Materials Research Society of Serbia - YUCOMAT 2017, Herceg Novi, Montenegro, Monday 4 - Friday 8 September 2017

Precise Chemical, Physical, and Electronic Nanoscale Contacts
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


Sunday 10 - Thursday 14 September 2017
XVI Brazil MRS Meeting, Gramado, Brazil, Sunday 10 - Thursday 14 September 2017

Precise Chemical, Physical, and Electronic Nanoscale Contacts
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

The physical, electronic, mechanical, and chemical connections that materials make to one another and to the outside world are critical. Just as the properties and applications of conventional semiconductor devices depend on these contacts, so do nanomaterials, many nanoscale measurements, and devices of the future. We discuss the important roles that these contacts can play in preserving key transport and other properties. Initial nanoscale connections and measurements guide the path to future opportunities and challenges ahead. Band alignment and minimally disruptive connections are both targets and can be characterized in both experiment and theory. I discuss our initial forays into this area in a number of materials systems.


Tuesday 3 October 2017
Nano@Wayne Seminar, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI

Cooperative Function in Atomically Precise Nanoscale Assemblies
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


Friday 13 October 2017
Dave Allara 80th Birthday Symposium, Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

Dave Allara's Legacy: Self-Assembly and Chemical Patterning across Scales
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


Monday 23 - Wednesday 25 October 2017
Third International Conference on Nanoenergy and Nanosystems 2017 (NENS2017), Beijing, China, Monday 23 - Wednesday 25 October 2017

Understanding Energy Conversion at the Ultimate Limits of Miniaturization
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


Monday 30 October 2017
American Vacuum Society, Tampa, Florida, Monday 30 - Thursday 2 November 2017

Precise Chemical, Physical, and Electronic Nanoscale Contacts
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

The physical, electronic, mechanical, and chemical connections that materials make to one another and to the outside world are critical. Just as the properties and applications of conventional semiconductor devices depend on these contacts, so do nanomaterials, many nanoscale measurements, and devices of the future. We discuss the important roles that these contacts can play in preserving key transport and other properties. Initial nanoscale connections and measurements guide the path to future opportunities and challenges ahead. Band alignment and minimally disruptive connections are both targets and can be characterized in both experiment and theory. I discuss our initial forays into this area in a number of materials systems.


Monday 30 - Thursday 2 November 2017
Leo Falicov Student Award Symposium, American Vacuum Society, Tampa, Florida, Monday 30 - Thursday 2 November 2017

Analyzing Spin Selectivity in DNA-Mediated Charge Transfer via Fluorescence Microscopy
John M. Abendroth,1,2 Nako Nakatsuka,1,2 Matthew Ye,1,2 Dokyun Kim,3 Eric E. Fullerton,3 Anne M. Andrews,1,2,4 and Paul S. Weiss,1,2,5
1California NanoSystems Institute, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095
2Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095
3Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, UCSD, La Jolla, CA
4Department of Psychiatry, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095
5Department of Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


Tuesday 26 - Saturday 30 June 2018
Third Telluride Conference on Molecular Rotors, Motors, and Switches, Telluride CO, Tuesday 26 - Saturday 30 June 2018

TBA
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


Other Upcoming Meetings of Interest

American Chemical Society and Affiliated Meetings -- the Next 10 Years.

American Physical Society and Affiliated Meetings this year or future years, the main (March) meeting is in March (surprise!) each year.

American Vacuum Society National Symposium is in October or November each year.
AVS-related Meetings.

Biophysical Society Annual Meeting is in February every year.

Faraday Discussions of the Chemical Society

The Federation of Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Societies (FACSS) Meeting

Foundations of Nanoscience Meetings are held in Snowbird, Utah every April.

Gordon Conferences.

Materials Research Society Meetings.
Fall in Boston. Spring in San Francisco.

Physical Electronics Conference
58th Annual Physical Electronics Conference held in 1998 at Penn State.

PittCon Meetings
PittCon.

Scientific Programme at the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy.

The Foresight Conferences on Molecular Nanotechnology.

The International Conference on Electron, Ion, and Photon Beam Technology and Nanofabrication (3 Beams).

Engineering Foundation Conferences


Chemical and Engineering News' List of Meetings

American Physical Society's List of Meetings

European Physics Society's List of Meetings

Materials Research Society's List of Meetings



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Group List Group Awards In the News UCLA California NanoSystems Institute Chemistry Department

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21 June 2017

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