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Weiss Group Meetings Self-Assembly & Molecular Devices Multi-Group Meetings


Tuesday 5 December 2017
Indian Institute of Technology Trivandrum, Trivandrum, Kerala, India

Precise Chemical, Physical, and Electronic Nanoscale Contacts
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

The physical, electronic, mechanical, and chemical connections that materials make to one another and to the outside world are critical. Just as the properties and applications of conventional semiconductor devices depend on these contacts, so do nanomaterials, many nanoscale measurements, and devices of the future. We discuss the important roles that these contacts can play in preserving key transport and other properties. Initial nanoscale connections and measurements guide the path to future opportunities and challenges ahead. Band alignment and minimally disruptive connections are both targets and can be characterized in both experiment and theory. I discuss our initial forays into this area in a number of materials systems.


Wednesday 6 December 2017
Nanotechnology India: PI Meeting of the Department of Science and Technology and Department of Biotechnology, Wednesday 6 - Friday 8 December 2017, Trivandrum, Kerala, India

Global Opportunities in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


Thursday 7 December 2017
Bangalore Nano, Bangalore, India

Global Opportunities in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


Thursday 7 December 2017
Prof. C. N. R. Rao Endowed Lecture, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India

Precise Chemical, Physical, and Electronic Nanoscale Contacts
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

The physical, electronic, mechanical, and chemical connections that materials make to one another and to the outside world are critical. Just as the properties and applications of conventional semiconductor devices depend on these contacts, so do nanomaterials, many nanoscale measurements, and devices of the future. We discuss the important roles that these contacts can play in preserving key transport and other properties. Initial nanoscale connections and measurements guide the path to future opportunities and challenges ahead. Band alignment and minimally disruptive connections are both targets and can be characterized in both experiment and theory. I discuss our initial forays into this area in a number of materials systems.


Monday 11 - Thursday 14 December 2017
Africa Materials Research Society Meeting Botswana, Gabarone, Botswana, Monday 11 - Thursday 14 December 2017

Global Opportunities in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

Two seemingly conflicting trends in nanoscience and nanotechnology are our increasing ability to reach the limits of atomically precise structures and our growing understanding of the importance of heterogeneity in the structure and function of molecules and nanoscale assemblies. By having developed the "eyes" to see, to record spectra, and to measure function at the nanoscale, we have been able to fabricate structures with precision as well as to understand the important and intrinsic heterogeneity of function found in these assemblies.

I will discuss the challenges, opportunities, and consequences of pursuing strategies to address both precision on the one hand and heterogeneity on the other. In our laboratories, we are taking the first steps to exploit precise assembly to optimize properties such as perfect electronic contacts in materials. We are also developing the means to make tens to hundreds of thousands of independent multimodal nanoscale measurements in order to understand the variations in structure and function that have previously been inaccessible in both synthetic and biological systems.

Another outcome of the development of our field has been our ability to communicate across fields. This skill that we develop in our students and colleagues has enhanced and accelerated the impact of nanoscience and nanotechnology on other fields, such as neuroscience and the microbiome. I will discuss the opportunities presented by these entanglements and give recent examples of advances enabled by nanoscience and nanotechnology.


Monday 11 - Thursday 14 December 2017
Africa Materials Research Society Meeting Botswana, Gabarone, Botswana, Monday 11 - Thursday 14 December 2017

Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, and Beyond
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

The birth and development of the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology have (uniquely) led to our ability to work and to communicate across fields. We have learned to share both problems and approaches. These skills have led to new approaches not only for our fields but for others. It is not accidental that nanoscientists have led the efforts worldwide to address problems in energy, water, security, medicine, neuroscience, the microbiome, and other areas. I will discuss how we can accelerate these efforts and leverage our skills to shape a safer, healthier world.


Wednesday 28 February 2018
PittCon 2018, Symposium on Nanobiotechnology against Cancer, Heart, and Neurological Diseases: A Fight in Progress, Orlando, FL, USA, Monday 26 February - Thursday 1 March 2018

Nanotechnology Approaches to Cellular Therapies
Paul S. Weiss1,2,3
1California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of 2Chemistry & Biochemistry and 3Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

We introduce biomolecular payloads into cells for gene editing at high throughput for off-the-shelf solutions targeting hemoglobinopathies, immune diseases, and cancers. We circumvent the need for viral transfection and electroporation, both of which have significant disadvantages in safety, throughput, cell viability, and cost. Mechanical deformation can make cell membranes transiently porous and enable gene-editing payloads to enter cells. These methods use specific chemical functionalization and control of surface contact and adhesion in microfluidic channels. Likewise, penetration of reproducibly nanomanufactured, loaded sharp features can introduce these packages into individual or many cells. We discuss our progress with these approaches and the methods that we use to quantify success.


Tuesday 5 March 2018
University of Notre Dame, Advanced Diagnostics & Therapeutics (AD&T) Annual Symposium Keynote address, Notre Dame, IN

Nanotechnology Approaches to Biological Heterogeneity and Cellular Therapies
Paul S. Weiss
California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

The great promise of single-molecule/assembly measurements is to understand how critical variations in structure, conformation, and environment relate to and control function. New approaches to sensing, imaging, and analysis are keys to elucidating these associations. I will discuss current and upcoming advances and will pose the challenges that lie ahead in creating, developing, and applying new tools for biology and medicine. These advances include using biomolecular recognition in sensor arrays to probe dynamic chemistry in the brain and microbiome systems. It also includes fusing spectroscopic imaging modalities and freeing up bandwidth in measurements to record simultaneous data streams and to expand our dynamic range. Recent advances in sparsity and compressive sensing can be applied both to new analysis methods and to directing measurements so as to assemble and to converge structural and functional information. Early examples will be discussed.


Sunday 18 - Thursday 22 March 2018
National American Chemical Society Meeting, New Orleans, LA, Sunday 18 - Thursday 22 March 2018
2018 Graduate Student Symposium in Memory of Richard Feynman

Exploring the Ultimate Limits of Miniaturization
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

The great promise of single-molecule/assembly measurements is to understand how critical variations in structure, conformation, and environment relate to and control function. New approaches to imaging and analysis are keys to elucidating these associations. I will discuss current and upcoming advances and will pose the challenges that lie ahead in creating, developing, and applying new tools for biology and medicine. These advances include fusing spectroscopic imaging modalities and freeing up bandwidth in measurements to record simultaneous data streams and to expand our dynamic range. Recent advances in sparsity and compressive sensing can be applied both to new analysis methods and to directing measurements so as to assemble and to converge structural and functional information. These efforts have opened the possibility of measuring the structures of biomolecular assemblies and ultimately associating variations in those structures and conformations with functional variations, as we ahve been able to for synthetic assemblies.


Sunday 18 - Thursday 22 March 2018
National American Chemical Society Meeting, New Orleans, LA, Sunday 18 - Thursday 22 March 2018
Stacey Bent Award Symposium

In Honor of Stacey Bent: Self-Assembly across Substrates
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

Following the lead of Prof. Stacey Bent, we have worked to reproduce the advantages of and control available for self-assembly on coinage metal surfaces to technological surfaces. Accomplishing this goal would add the chemical dimension to nanolithography. One of the key challenges is removing surface passivation layers and preventing side reactions, such as oxides and oxidation, respectively, on group IV semiconducor surfaces. We describe our efforts in this controlled surface chemisryt. In addition, new families of highly symmetric molecules are being developed to yield even greater control and are enabling elucidation of the key design parameters of both the molecules and assemblies. These design elements, in turn, enable controlled chemical patterning from the sub-nanometer to the centimeter scales. We simultaneously develop metrology tools for these methods to give unprecedented insight on the structures, function, and properties of these assemblies.


Monday 14 May 2018
TechConnect, Anaheim, CA, Friday 11 - Thursday 17 May 2018

TBA
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


Wednesday 16 May 2018
Electrochemical Society, Seattle, WA, Sunday 13 - Thursday 17 May 2018

Nanotechnology Approaches to Biological Heterogeneity
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


Tuesday 26 - Saturday 30 June 2018
Third Telluride Conference on Molecular Rotors, Motors, and Switches, Telluride, CO, Tuesday 26 - Saturday 30 June 2018

TBA
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


Other Upcoming Meetings of Interest

American Chemical Society and Affiliated Meetings -- the Next 10 Years.

American Physical Society and Affiliated Meetings this year or future years, the main (March) meeting is in March (surprise!) each year.

American Vacuum Society National Symposium is in October or November each year.
AVS-related Meetings.

Biophysical Society Annual Meeting is in February every year.

Faraday Discussions of the Chemical Society

The Federation of Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Societies (FACSS) Meeting

Foundations of Nanoscience Meetings are held in Snowbird, Utah every April.

Gordon Conferences.

Materials Research Society Meetings.
Fall in Boston. Spring in San Francisco.

Physical Electronics Conference
58th Annual Physical Electronics Conference held in 1998 at Penn State.

PittCon Meetings
PittCon.

Scientific Programme at the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy.

The International Conference on Electron, Ion, and Photon Beam Technology and Nanofabrication (3 Beams).

Engineering Foundation Conferences


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American Physical Society's List of Meetings

European Physics Society's List of Meetings

Materials Research Society's List of Meetings



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19 November 2017

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