Upcoming Talks

(Last Updated On: March 11, 2020)

Archive of Previous Talks


Thursday, 2 April 2020, Arizona State University, School of Molecular Science, Eyring (Public) Lectures, Phoenix, AZ.

Nanotechnology Approaches to Biology and Medicine

Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Bioengineering, and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

Biology functions at the nanoscale. Thus, there are special opportunities not only to make biological measurements using nanotechnology, but also to interact directly in order to influence biological outcomes. Nanoscience and nanotechnology developed from chemistry, physics, biology, engineering, medicine, toxicology, and a host of other fields. Along the way, we taught each other our problems, challenges, and approaches. The interdisciplinary communication skills that were developed and are now part of our training remain unique to the field. As a result, nanoscience contributes to a wide range of other fields, such as neuroscience and the microbiome.


Friday, 3 April 2020, Arizona State University, School of Molecular Science, Eyring (Department) Lectures, Phoenix, AZ.

Precise Chemical, Physical, and Electronic Nanoscale Contacts

Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Bioengineering, and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

Two seemingly conflicting trends in nanoscience and nanotechnology are our increasing ability to reach the limits of atomically precise structures and our growing understanding of the importance of heterogeneity in the structure and function of molecules and nanoscale assemblies. By having developed the “eyes” to see, to record spectra, and to measure function at the nanoscale, we have been able to fabricate structures with precision as well as to understand the important and intrinsic heterogeneity of function found in these assemblies. The physical, electronic, mechanical, and chemical connections that materials make to one another and to the outside world are critical. Just as the properties and applications of conventional semiconductor devices depend on these contacts, so do nanomaterials, many nanoscale measurements, and devices of the future. We discuss the important roles that these contacts can play in preserving key transport and other properties. Initial nanoscale connections and measurements guide the path to future opportunities and challenges ahead. Band alignment and minimally disruptive connections are both targets and can be characterized in both experiment and theory. I discuss our initial forays into this area in a number of materials systems.


University of Miami, School of Medicine, Miami, FL, 24 April 2020.

TBD

Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Bioengineering, and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


University of Massachusetts, School of Medicine, Boston, MA, 29 April 2020.

TBD

Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Bioengineering, and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


Franklin Memorial Lectures, Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas, 4 May 2020.

TBD

Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Bioengineering, and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


ACS Colloid, Rice University, Houston, Houston, Texas, 7-10 June 2020.

TBD

Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Bioengineering, and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


Friday, 19 June 2020, Nano@Iowa State, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa.

Global Opportunities in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Bioengineering, and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

Two seemingly conflicting trends in nanoscience and nanotechnology are our increasing ability to reach the limits of atomically precise structures and our growing understanding of the importance of heterogeneity in the structure and function of molecules and nanoscale assemblies. By having developed the “eyes” to see, to record spectra, and to measure function at the nanoscale, we have been able to fabricate structures with precision as well as to understand the important and intrinsic heterogeneity of function found in these assemblies.

I will discuss the challenges, opportunities, and consequences of pursuing strategies to address both precision on the one hand and heterogeneity on the other. In our laboratories, we are taking the first steps to exploit precise assembly to optimize properties such as perfect electronic contacts in materials. We are also developing the means to make tens to hundreds of thousands of independent multimodal nanoscale measurements in order to understand the variations in structure and function that have previously been inaccessible in both synthetic and biological systems.


AAAFM-UCLA 2020, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, 16-18 June 2020.

Title TBD

Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Bioengineering, and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


AIE20 International Conference, Guangzhou, China, 24-27 July 2020.

Title TBD

Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Bioengineering, and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


7 August 2020, Xiamen University, Fujian Province, China.

Nanotechnology Approaches to Biology and Medicine

Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Bioengineering, and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

Biology functions at the nanoscale. Thus, there are special opportunities not only to make biological measurements using nanotechnology, but also to interact directly in order to influence biological outcomes. Nanoscience and nanotechnology developed from chemistry, physics, biology, engineering, medicine, toxicology, and a host of other fields. Along the way, we taught each other our problems, challenges, and approaches. The interdisciplinary communication skills that were developed and are now part of our training remain unique to the field. As a result, nanoscience contributes to a wide range of other fields, such as neuroscience and the microbiome.


7th International Conference on Chemical Bonding, Kauai, HI, 9-13 August 2020.

Cage-Molecule Self-Assembly: Long-Range Interactions and Tests of the Effects of Dimensionality and Confinement in Chemistry
Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Bioengineering, and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095

Self-assembled cage molecules offer an opportunity to test chemical and physical properties because within families of molecules, they form identical lattices. Thus, properties such as atomic arrangements within the cage, molecular and surface dipoles, band alignment, and functional group placement can all be controlled. We describe atomic-scale measurements of coordination and valency, dipole, dipole interactions, hydrogen bonding, band alignment, dimensional effects on pKa.


KAIST Advanced Materials Workshop, Daejeon, Korea, 4-5 August 2020.

TBD

Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Bioengineering, and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


University of Toronto, Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, Toronto, ON, Canada, 8 September 2020.

TBD

Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Bioengineering, and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


Serbian Materials Research Society Meeting, Herceg Novi, Montenegro, September 2020.

TBD

Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Bioengineering, and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


NanoBio Meeting, Heraklion, Crete, Greece, September 2020.

TBD

Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Bioengineering, and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


2020 KSBB Fall Meeting and International Symposium, Suwon Convention Center, South Korea, 15-16 October 2020.

TBD

Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Bioengineering, and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


Pacifichem 2020, Honolulu, Hawaii, 15-20 December 2020.

TBD

Paul S. Weiss, California NanoSystems Institute and Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Bioengineering, and Materials Science & Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095


Other Upcoming Meetings of Interest


American Chemical Society and Affiliated Meetings — the Next 10 Years.

American Physical Society and Affiliated Meetings this year or future years, the main (March) meeting is in March (surprise!) each year.

American Vacuum Society National Symposium is in October or November each year.
AVS-related Meetings.

Biophysical Society Annual Meeting is in February every year.

Faraday Discussions of the Chemical Society

The Federation of Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Societies (FACSS) Meeting

Foundations of Nanoscience Meetings are held in Snowbird, Utah every April.

Gordon Conferences.

Materials Research Society Meetings.
Fall in Boston. Spring in San Francisco.

Physical Electronics Conference
58th Annual Physical Electronics Conference held in 1998 at Penn State.

PittCon Meetings
PittCon.

Scientific Programme at the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy.

The International Conference on Electron, Ion, and Photon Beam Technology and Nanofabrication (3 Beams).

Engineering Foundation Conferences


Chemical and Engineering News‘ List of Meetings

American Physical Society‘s List of Meetings

European Physics Society‘s List of Meetings

Materials Research Society‘s List of Meetings